Forum: Music discussion

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Topic: how to mix trap and different bpm songs
Hello everyone,
I have 2 questions for you guys:
1.how to mix trap
2.how to mix tracks with different bpms which have quite short intro and vocals are coming straight as song begins
Please give me some tips if anyone knows

Posted Thu 28 Nov 13 @ 8:41 pm
You mix Trap the same as you would any other genre. You drive a BMW the same as you drive a Mercedes - it's still driving, no matter who makes the vehicle.

You mix tracks with different BPMs by adjusting the tempo/pitch control of your DJ equipment. With the wide range of adjustment available now, it's possible to match any two tempos.

However, if the track tempos are very different and you don't want things to sound ridiculous, you should limit the amount of BPM adjustment to low single % figures. To get from one track to another when the tempos are very different, don't mix. Choose another method of getting from A to B, such as using a brake effect or echo/reverb.

For further information, please read the two pinned topics at the top of the Mix Lessons forum - Club Mixing and DJ Mixing.


Posted Fri 29 Nov 13 @ 6:38 am
groovindj wrote :
You mix Trap the same as you would any other genre. You drive a BMW the same as you drive a Mercedes - it's still driving, no matter who makes the vehicle.

You mix tracks with different BPMs by adjusting the tempo/pitch control of your DJ equipment. With the wide range of adjustment available now, it's possible to match any two tempos.

However, if the track tempos are very different and you don't want things to sound ridiculous, you should limit the amount of BPM adjustment to low single % figures. To get from one track to another when the tempos are very different, don't mix. Choose another method of getting from A to B, such as using a brake effect or echo/reverb.

For further information, please read the two pinned topics at the top of the Mix Lessons forum - Club Mixing and DJ Mixing.


Do you mean the principle of trap mixing is the same as in house, dubstep,etc?mix in the second track when the kick drops in the first one?


Posted Fri 29 Nov 13 @ 10:06 am
The principle of mixing two tracks together is the same for any genre. Match the beats.

There are different styles of mixing/DJing, some of which may be more commonly used for a particular genre - but beat mixing is beat mixing.

My advice would be to use the methods you're most comfortable with. Don't feel that you have to do things a certain way because someone tells you, or because you read/heard that genre A has to be mixed this this, but genre B has to be mixed like that.

Posted Fri 29 Nov 13 @ 10:26 am
My approach to mixing changing BPMs is usually if you know in advance it's going to be a trainwreck (i.e. the grid not mapping properly because VDJ has a big problem with grid mapping anything that isn't a 4/4 kick/snare...anything syncopated with a live drummer you have to approach it like you're mixing with vinyl with the added advantage of key lock), what I usually do is just throw a cool effect on like a dotted eighth delay out or a backspin then trigger a sample then drop the next song at the recorded tempo and mix on that tempo.
I usually break my playlists into BPMs and time of the night. If it's a wedding and they've been sitting through dinner and speeches all night and they're itching to go after the first dances, I start around 120-124bpm and quickly ramp it up into the 128-132 territory. If it's near the end of the night and it's nearly empty and there's a few stragglers, I have a "GTFO" set which is usually a lot of stuff I like (house music from 1988 or anything that was big in the UK between 1988 and 1995) and if people dance...bonus!
As for trap, I like to save it for as late as I can, but my most common trap set lately is:
Fetty Wap - 679/Trap Queen
Drake - Hotline Bling
Silento - Watch Me Whip
Harlem Shake (because of the dance associated with...it was a floor filler for a while and young kids still seem to like it)
Also, if I want to ramp things back up to a faster tempo I'll throw in something like Macklemore - Can't Hold Us as it's double the tempo of most trap tracks (i.e. Most Fetty Wap tracks are around 70bpm, and Can't Hold Us is 140 during the chorus).
Most of the time, programming a set is about mass psychology and simple math as well as musical fundamentals. Approach it with that mindset and your mixes will kick ass every time.

Posted Sat 26 Mar 16 @ 5:18 am
gstribPRO InfinityMember since 2010
Murad Sensus wrote :
Hello everyone,
I have 2 questions for you guys:
1.how to mix trap
2.how to mix tracks with different bpms which have quite short intro and vocals are coming straight as song begins
Please give me some tips if anyone knows


The guys above gave some good tips and ideas on how to mix various genres and BPMs. Check out the following link for a example of a trap mix.

https://www.mixcloud.com/DJG5/trap-mix-4/

Posted Sun 24 Apr 16 @ 7:56 pm
Hi...I am new to vdj. I am using VDJ 8. I have different questions:
1. Sometimes when I mix two sound, one song plays louder than the other one or quieter... how do i manage for the two songs to play at the same level.
2. In night clubs when we listen to djs... it seems that all the tracks are playing on the same bpm...even songs not having the same bpm.... how can I do this on VDJ 8.

With thanxxxx

Posted Mon 10 Oct 16 @ 2:09 am
Assuming you analysed the BPM correctly and don't have any other technical issues going on, this is probably because the "energy" of a track is only partially determined by its speed (BPM). Many other compositional factors play a huge role in how a song's energy level is perceived.

I've had a DJ residency at a pop music night for several years now and one of my favorite examples of a counter-intuitive relationship between speed/BPM and "energy" of the type I am talking about is Outkast's "Hey Ya." This song is actually surprisingly "slow" -- about 100BPM or so, if I recall -- but it's a monster banger that substantially raises the energy on the dancefloor even if the song that preceded it was actually objectively much faster. This has to do with the arrangement of the song, the particular drum pattern used, the mood of the lyrics / harmony, all sorts of things. So BPM by itself is not always necessarily the best metric of how a song is perceived.

(Other recent examples from pop music: Pharell Williams' "Happy" and Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off." All ~100BPM, but don't feel like it.)

Popular hip-hop is also a good place to draw illustrative cases from. For example:
-Iggy Azalea - Fancy
-Notorious B.I.G. - Hypnotize
-Macklemore - Thrift Shop
These songs are all very very close in BPM, but vary substantially in how they feel. Specifically: the first two feel slower / more laid-back to me, whereas the third packs considerably more energy. Again, compositional factors at work.

This is hardly restricted to pop music, either. A large portion of classic disco & funk music, for example, is squarely in the 110-115BPM range, and rarely goes above 120. This stands in contrast against, say, "deep house" music, which is typically 120 or greater, but won't necessarily feel more intense than slower disco songs. And then you have things like "garage" or "tech house" that are comparable to deep house music in terms of BPM, but which tend to have much more energy, largely because of how much "busier" the drum work tends to be in those genres.

Anyways, all this is important because "energy management" is an absolutely essential part of being a good DJ. For this it's crucial to be able to appreciate all the different factors that determine the perception of a track.

Lastly, as a bonus tip to any other DJs out there, I have to say that one of the most drastic improvements to my own sets came when I started being very diligent about organizing my music collection with respect to energy/intensity. These days I look not only at the BPM, but I also include a separate field in the meta-data of all my mp3's that I use to rate each song's intensity on a simple scale from 1-5 (mp3s have a "rating" field which you can easily adapt to this purpose, or you can co-opt one of the many other meta-data fields for this). So now when I open up Traktor, I can sort my song collection either by BPM or by intensity rating, which yields different -- and often counter-intuitive -- track sortings, but which really yields tangible results when managing the overall flow of a set.

Posted Mon 10 Oct 16 @ 6:46 am
DJ ARGHAJIT, if you're going to copy and paste someone elses post from the web, at least have the decency to credit your source.

When I saw the post, I guessed it wasn't written by you, based on other posts that you actually did write. This was much too verbose to have been written by you.

A short Google later, and I found your source. The text you stole was actually written by someone called Matt Carland in 2014.

Posted Mon 10 Oct 16 @ 5:04 pm
ohshitPRO InfinityMember since 2011
DJ ARGHAJIT what a shame.

Posted Mon 10 Oct 16 @ 5:21 pm
I think you should know best because there must be a reason why you chose to want to make that impossible possible. What I try is to find some other track I know that fits better. I you like how it sounds when you mix it (lucky or not) just focus on the next surprise you have for your audiance

Posted Fri 14 Oct 16 @ 12:53 am
Murad Sensus wrote :
Hello everyone,
I have 2 questions for you guys:
1.how to mix trap
2.how to mix tracks with different bpms which have quite short intro and vocals are coming straight as song begins
Please give me some tips if anyone knows


Make it double as fast or both half. Look up CBG in the user manual...

Posted Fri 14 Oct 16 @ 12:55 am
DJGyllburt wrote :
My approach to mixing changing BPMs is usually if you know in advance it's going to be a trainwreck (i.e. the grid not mapping properly because VDJ has a big problem with grid mapping anything that isn't a 4/4 kick/snare...anything syncopated with a live drummer you have to approach it like you're mixing with vinyl with the added advantage of key lock), what I usually do is just throw a cool effect on like a dotted eighth delay out or a backspin then trigger a sample then drop the next song at the recorded tempo and mix on that tempo.
I usually break my playlists into BPMs and time of the night. If it's a wedding and they've been sitting through dinner and speeches all night and they're itching to go after the first dances, I start around 120-124bpm and quickly ramp it up into the 128-132 territory. If it's near the end of the night and it's nearly empty and there's a few stragglers, I have a "GTFO" set which is usually a lot of stuff I like (house music from 1988 or anything that was big in the UK between 1988 and 1995) and if people dance...bonus!
As for trap, I like to save it for as late as I can, but my most common trap set lately is:
Fetty Wap - 679/Trap Queen
Drake - Hotline Bling
Silento - Watch Me Whip
Harlem Shake (because of the dance associated with...it was a floor filler for a while and young kids still seem to like it)
Also, if I want to ramp things back up to a faster tempo I'll throw in something like Macklemore - Can't Hold Us as it's double the tempo of most trap tracks (i.e. Most Fetty Wap tracks are around 70bpm, and Can't Hold Us is 140 during the chorus).
Most of the time, programming a set is about mass psychology and simple math as well as musical fundamentals. Approach it with that mindset and your mixes will kick ass every time.



Solid advice right here! It's a lot of several factors that need consideration. Sit down with your library and work on some of these techniques and considerations while you practice.


Posted Tue 18 Oct 16 @ 1:39 pm
DJ ARGHAJIT wrote :


Anyways, all this is important because "energy management" is an absolutely essential part of being a good DJ. For this it's crucial to be able to appreciate all the different factors that determine the perception of a track.

Lastly, as a bonus tip to any other DJs out there, I have to say that one of the most drastic improvements to my own sets came when I started being very diligent about organizing my music collection with respect to energy/intensity. These days I look not only at the BPM, but I also include a separate field in the meta-data of all my mp3's that I use to rate each song's intensity on a simple scale from 1-5 (mp3s have a "rating" field which you can easily adapt to this purpose, or you can co-opt one of the many other meta-data fields for this). So now when I open up Traktor, I can sort my song collection either by BPM or by intensity rating, which yields different -- and often counter-intuitive -- track sortings, but which really yields tangible results when managing the overall flow of a set.



This is also solid advice! Take it and run with it.

Posted Tue 18 Oct 16 @ 1:45 pm
mixing trap and diffrent bpm song is at tyms hard. but i thnk some tyms looping a song with a low bpm than the othere can help or use samples and effects when mixing to help with that smooth flow

Posted Tue 27 Feb 18 @ 6:51 am